display – play – control

Doctor Who Sonic Screwdriver

Twelfth Doctor’s Extending Sonic Screwdriver universal remote

The Wand Company’s all new Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver universal remote control is a beautifully designed and highly detailed working prop replica of the Twelfth Doctor’s iconic gadget. It has been carefully fabricated from a mix of copper plated die-cast metal, engineering plastics and soft-touch, leather-effect, thermoplastic rubber to give a truly realistic product.

Its seamless construction mimics that of Peter Capaldi’s own hero prop and the flick-to-extend action opens the Sonic Screwdriver with the most authentically satisfying clunk. Press the grip mounted button for instant action in FX Mode, and access 12 different sonic buzzes, beeps and scanning sounds from the universe of Doctor Who.

Our Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is an advanced gesture-based remote control that is compatible with almost all home entertainment equipment worldwide, such as iPod docks, TVs and Blu-ray players.

Extending: Authentic flick action extends sonic and opens clasps

Hand-polished metal parts: nickel and brass-plated die-cast details

Guided Setup: Speech Teach, tells you how to use it with spoken prompts

FX Mode: Authentic special FX sounds from the Whoniverse at the press of a button

Advanced gesture recognition: 13 gestures in three memory banks means that 39 remote control codes can be stored

Any-TV-Off mode: Easily turn off TVs without the need for programming

Stand and blueprint manual: Clear Gallifreyan stand for vertical presentation

attention to detail

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The Sonic Screwdriver is packed with exciting features. In FX Mode there are 12 sonic and scanning sounds from the universe of Doctor Who to explore, 12 new Morse coded phrases automatically broadcast every hour when the Sonic is left motionless in its stand, and its über cool grip-button-activated Any-TV-Off

quality materials

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Hand polished, copper plated die castings, two-tone swirl mouldings and an authentic mixture of rubber, plastic and metal components are all brought together to create an exceptionally well-finished Series 7+ replica that not only looks great, but really feels like it means business.

the ultimate collectible

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Whether you have just discovered Doctor Who or have been hooked since you were a kid, this Sonic Screwdriver is something that you just have to own. Researched, designed and built with fanatical attention to detail, the simplicity of its crystal-clear Gallifreyan stand presents this iconic piece perfectly.

the fantasy made real

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Who would have thought that you could own a real working Sonic Screwdriver. This replica boasts a host of exciting features such as flick to extend, grip mounted button with press for action in FX Mode, Any-TV-Off, 12 authentic Sonic Whoniverse sounds, and it’s also a fully-functional gesture-based universal remote control.

The Wand Company’s unique gesture-based remote control technology brings the fantasy to life

This Series 7-9 Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Universal Remote Control is not a toy: it is an advanced, gesture based universal remote control, designed to control almost all home entertainment equipment worldwide such as TVs, DVD players, Blu-ray players and iPod docks, using infrared codes learned from conventional remote controls by the means of gestures rather than by pressing buttons. A total of 13 different gestures and three separate memory banks enable this Sonic Screwdriver to learn up to 39 remote control functions. At the press of the grip mounted button, the Sonic’s tip illuminates and the Sonic produces one of twelve different Sonic beeps, buzzes and scanning sounds from the universe of Doctor Who, and has the power to instantly turn off any TV without any programming or code learning required.

The authentic flicking action allows the Sonic to be used in exactly the same way the Doctor uses it. The Sonic is powered by AAA batteries which deliver months of fun between changes.

Programming the Sonic Screwdriver by learning the codes from a standard remote control is easy

programming 12th Doctor's sonic

To program the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver, enter Programming Mode and perform the desired gesture; the Sonic Screwdriver will say which gesture has been done, then the emitter will glow steady green to signify that it is waiting to receive the IR code (button press) from a normal remote control. Hold a normal remote control about 1” (2.5cm) from the tip of the Sonic Screwdriver while it is glowing green, and briefly press and release the normal remote control button for the function you want to program on to that gesture. It’s that easy!

The flickable Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is packed with features that enrich the owning experience, making it perfect for Whovians of all ages

In FX Mode the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic screwdriver is always ready for action. Press and hold the grip-mounted button to light the tip and make the classic sonic buzz, just like The Doctor. Double press and hold the button down to access another eleven buzzes, beeps and scanning sounds from the universe of Doctor Who, or leave the Sonic on its Gallifreyan stand to send out one of 12 Morse coded phrases from the Twelfth Doctor.

Flick the Sonic Screwdriver to extend it with a satisfying clunk, just like The Doctor does on the show. The claws spring open and the marbled core is revealed. Use the Any-TV-Off function to take control of any television without the need to program the Sonic Screwdriver by pressing the grip-mounted button three times in FX Mode to make it scan through all known TV-Off codes until it finds the one that turns the TV off.

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Where you can buy a Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver

The Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is available from various online retailers around the world and in some places, from high street shops. A web search for “Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver” will find the retailer nearest you. However, to get you started, the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is available from the following retailers:

In the United States: ThinkGeek and Amazon.com.

In the United Kingdom: Amazon.co.uk, Forbidden Planet and Firebox.

In Germany: Amazon.de.

In Australia: Yellow Octopus and Latest Buy.

Frequently-asked questions

Look down this list of frequently-asked questions to find answers that will help you if you are thinking of buying a Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver and want to learn more about how it works or how accurate it is.

For further information on the features and operation of the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver please see our online version of the full user manual, or you can download a printer friendly PDF version of the manual.

Will the Sonic Screwdriver work with my equipment?

The Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is compatible with almost all makes of home audio-visual equipment around the world, such as TVs, DVD players, hi-fis and set-top boxes. Please note that the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver only works with infra-red (IR) remote controls, not radio-frequency (RF) remotes, and that the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is not compatible with Bang & Olufsen equipment.

Can the Sonic Screwdriver perform all functions of my remote control?

No, the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is not a full replacement for your standard remote control. However, with 13 gestures and three memory banks, it can learn the infra-red (IR) codes from 39 of the buttons on your existing remote controls. This is enough for you to have some fun performing controlling your home entertainment equipment. You can over-write any of the 39 functions with new IR codes at any time, if you change your mind about the functions that you want the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver to perform.

Is the Sonic Screwdriver easy to use?

Like any sensitive instrument, it takes a bit of practice to master the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver. Some trainee companions seem to be natural time lords and fair well without the psychic interface and can zap TVs and iPod docks into silence with it straight away, but for most trainees, about ten minutes’ practice is required to get the hang of the different movement gestures. Please note that the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver does require quite precise hand movements to perform the gestures, so we do not recommend it as a remote control for the elderly or infirm.

What batteries does the Sonic Screwdriver use?

The Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver uses two AAA (LR03) batteries. Batteries are not supplied with the product and must be inserted before first use. Always use alkaline batteries and never mix old and new batteries. Do not use zinc-carbon batteries (which are often labelled “extra heavy duty” or similar) are much less powerful and don’t cope well with the large bursts of energy used when transmitting infrared (IR) codes.
Make sure to insert the batteries the correct way round, i.e. with the positive pips facing into the Sonic Screwdriver battery compartment, and make sure that you align the two yellow dots on the housing halves when you reassemble the Sonic.

Note that this product will not work with rechargeable batteries, which have a reduced voltage (1.2V compared with 1.5V for alkaline batteries).

Is the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver a “screen-accurate” replica?

No, although the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Universal Remote Control (URC) is close to the real thing, it is not a fully accurate screen replica. There are detail differences between the Sonic Screwdriver Universal Remote Control and the prop that is used on the TV show which help make the Sonic Screwdriver URC more manufacturable and considerably less expensive than the accurate replicas, which can cost as much as $4,000 US dollars. The most noticeable differences are:

Tip material swirl

The Sonic Screwdriver URC tip is made from a solid transparent self-coloured injection moulded polycarbonate. The colour is a close match to the prop, but does not have the original lighter swirling pattern in it, due to the fact that this would block the infrared signal from passing through the tip.

The shape of the clasp assembly, and the upper and lower cage

The metallic parts are manufactured using a diecasting process rather than being individually hand machined, as a result the shape of the clasps, the upper and lower cage have been changed slightly to make them possible to cast.

The lack of brass rivets

As rivets were not needed in the Sonic Screwdriver URC design, to keep manufacturing costs down, fake brass rivet features were incorporated into the lower cage moulding.

Shape of the cover ring

This is perhaps the most noticeable difference between the hero prop and The Sonic Screwdriver URC. The Sonic Screwdriver URC has to come apart so that the batteries can be changed. To avoid unsightly parting lines and fixing screws showing on the outside of the Sonic Screwdriver, the ideal place for this was in the middle, and the cover ring was used to hide the join. This provides an elegant solution but means that the cover ring has to taper less than this feature on the original prop.

The handle isn’t made from leather

Due to cost constraints, the handle could not be made in leather. The real prop also has a protruding button soldered on to a square cut out in the grip material, which the actors use to make the tip glow when the script requires it. The Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver URC does not have this exact button but uses a button under and protected by the grip material. Because as it is never shown in the TV show we did not think that it was intended to be part of the overall look of the device and so designed the most robust button for the range of uses that this sonic would be subjected to.

It is slightly lighter than the prop.

Although the Sonic Screwdriver does feel nice and heavy in the hand, it is in fact lighter than the screen prop (205 g compared to around 268 g for the original prop). This is because the original is a more solid construction, without the space inside to house the electronics and batteries.

Can I program my Sonic if I have lost my original remote?

No. The Sonic Screwdriver is a learning remote and you have to teach it the infra-red (IR) codes from your original remote control(s).

Will the Sonic Screwdriver forget the programmed codes if I let the battery completely run down?

No, the codes are not erased when the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver batteries are run down nor when the Sonic Screwdriver is opened to change the batteries. The Sonic Screwdriver will retain the remote control codes it has learned even if it is left with no batteries in it for a long period.

Where can I buy a Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver universal remote?

The Twelfth Doctor’s sonic is available from the following official retailers.

In the United States:

ThinkGeek

Amazon.com

In the United Kingdom:

Amazon.co.uk

Forbidden Planet

Firebox

In Germany:

Amazon.de

In Australia:

BBC Australia Shop

Frequently-asked questions

Look down this list of frequently-asked questions to find answers that will help you if you are thinking of buying a Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver and want to learn more about how it works or how accurate it is.

For further information on the features and operation of the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver please see our online version of the full user manual, or you can download a printer friendly PDF version of the manual.

Will the Sonic Screwdriver work with my equipment?

The Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is compatible with almost all makes of home audio-visual equipment around the world, such as TVs, DVD players, hi-fis and set-top boxes. Please note that the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver only works with infra-red (IR) remote controls, not radio-frequency (RF) remotes, and that the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is not compatible with Bang & Olufsen equipment.

Can the Sonic Screwdriver perform all functions of my remote control?

No, the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is not a full replacement for your standard remote control. However, with 13 gestures and three memory banks, it can learn the infra-red (IR) codes from 39 of the buttons on your existing remote controls. This is enough for you to have some fun performing controlling your home entertainment equipment. You can over-write any of the 39 functions with new IR codes at any time, if you change your mind about the functions that you want the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver to perform.

Is the Sonic Screwdriver easy to use?

Like any sensitive instrument, it takes a bit of practice to master the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver. Some trainee companions seem to be natural time lords and fair well without the psychic interface and can zap TVs and iPod docks into silence with it straight away, but for most trainees, about ten minutes’ practice is required to get the hang of the different movement gestures. Please note that the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver does require quite precise hand movements to perform the gestures, so we do not recommend it as a remote control for the elderly or infirm.

What batteries does the Sonic Screwdriver use?

The Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver uses two AAA (LR03) batteries. Batteries are not supplied with the product and must be inserted before first use. Always use alkaline batteries and never mix old and new batteries. Do not use zinc-carbon batteries (which are often labelled “extra heavy duty” or similar) are much less powerful and don’t cope well with the large bursts of energy used when transmitting infrared (IR) codes.

Make sure to insert the batteries the correct way round, i.e. with the positive pips facing into the Sonic Screwdriver battery compartment, and make sure that you align the two yellow dots on the housing halves when you reassemble the Sonic.

Note that this product will not work with rechargeable batteries, which have a reduced voltage (1.2V compared with 1.5V for alkaline batteries).

Is the Twelfth Doctor's Sonic Screwdriver a “screen-accurate” replica?

No, although the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Universal Remote Control (URC) is close to the real thing, it is not a fully accurate screen replica. There are detail differences between the Sonic Screwdriver Universal Remote Control and the prop that is used on the TV show which help make the Sonic Screwdriver URC more manufacturable and considerably less expensive than the accurate replicas, which can cost as much as $4,000 US dollars. The most noticeable differences are:

Tip material swirl

The Sonic Screwdriver URC tip is made from a solid transparent self-coloured injection moulded polycarbonate. The colour is a close match to the prop, but does not have the original lighter swirling pattern in it, due to the fact that this would block the infrared signal from passing through the tip.

The shape of the clasp assembly, and the upper and lower cage

The metallic parts are manufactured using a diecasting process rather than being individually hand machined, as a result the shape of the clasps, the upper and lower cage have been changed slightly to make them possible to cast.

The lack of brass rivets

As rivets were not needed in the Sonic Screwdriver URC design, to keep manufacturing costs down, fake brass rivet features were incorporated into the lower cage moulding.

Shape of the cover ring

This is perhaps the most noticeable difference between the hero prop and The Sonic Screwdriver URC. The Sonic Screwdriver URC has to come apart so that the batteries can be changed. To avoid unsightly parting lines and fixing screws showing on the outside of the Sonic Screwdriver, the ideal place for this was in the middle, and the cover ring was used to hide the join. This provides an elegant solution but means that the cover ring has to taper less than this feature on the original prop.

The handle isn’t made from leather

Due to cost constraints, the handle could not be made in leather. The real prop also has a protruding button soldered on to a square cut out in the grip material, which the actors use to make the tip glow when the script requires it. The Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver URC does not have this exact button but uses a button under and protected by the grip material. Because as it is never shown in the TV show we did not think that it was intended to be part of the overall look of the device and so designed the most robust button for the range of uses that this sonic would be subjected to.

It is slightly lighter than the prop.

Although the Sonic Screwdriver does feel nice and heavy in the hand, it is in fact lighter than the screen prop (205 g compared to around 268 g for the original prop). This is because the original is a more solid construction, without the space inside to house the electronics and batteries.

Can I program my Sonic Screwdriver if I have lost my original remote?

No. The Sonic Screwdriver is a learning remote and you have to teach it the infra-red (IR) codes from your original remote control(s).

Will the Sonic Screwdriver forget the programmed codes if I let the battery completely run down?

No, the codes are not erased when the Twelfth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver batteries are run down nor when the Sonic Screwdriver is opened to change the batteries. The Sonic Screwdriver will retain the remote control codes it has learned even if it is left with no batteries in it for a long period.

Where can I buy a Twelfth Doctor's Sonic Screwdriver universal remote?

The Twelfth Doctor’s sonic will begin shipping in September 2015. If you would like to ensure you get one, you can register your interest to be the first to receive one, or pre-order one from the following official retailers.

In the United States:

Think Geek

Amazon.com

In the United Kingdom:

Amazon.co.uk

BBC Shop UK

Forbidden Planet

Firebox

In Germany:

Amazon.de

In Australia:

BBC Australia Shop